Shrink films are often used in the context of packaging. These films have been stretched during the manufacturing process and when heated return to their original shape because of what is known as the "memory effect". During packaging, a tubular shrink film is usually placed around the product being packaged. When it is subsequently heated with hot air, the film constricts until it hugs the packaged product. This process is used both for small products (such as lipsticks) and entire pallets that have been loaded with goods. Hot air shrinking is also widely used in beverage packaging applications. 

  • Instead of having a label applied to them, individual bottles are often wrapped in a decorative shrink-on hose, which – in this case – is referred to as a "sleeve". This may only cover part of the bottle or may extend across the entire height. 
  • Another typical application is the use of shrink film to create a pack of between six and twenty-four bottles or cans. 
  • Shrink-on caps are placed over wine bottle closures (screw tops or corks) to protect them against dirt or for decorative purposes. When these preformed caps are exposed to hot air, they shrink tightly around the neck of the bottle and closure. 

The following materials are commonly used for shrink films, depending on the application: polyolefins (PP and PE), PET, and PVC.

Shrink films are often used in the context of packaging. These films have been stretched during the manufacturing process and when heated return to their original shape because of what is known as the "memory effect". During packaging, a tubular shrink film is usually placed around the product being packaged. When it is subsequently heated with hot air, the film constricts until it hugs the packaged product. This process is used both for small products (such as lipsticks) and entire pallets that have been loaded with goods. Hot air shrinking is also widely used in beverage packaging applications. 

  • Instead of having a label applied to them, individual bottles are often wrapped in a decorative shrink-on hose, which – in this case – is referred to as a "sleeve". This may only cover part of the bottle or may extend across the entire height. 
  • Another typical application is the use of shrink film to create a pack of between six and twenty-four bottles or cans. 
  • Shrink-on caps are placed over wine bottle closures (screw tops or corks) to protect them against dirt or for decorative purposes. When these preformed caps are exposed to hot air, they shrink tightly around the neck of the bottle and closure. 

The following materials are commonly used for shrink films, depending on the application: polyolefins (PP and PE), PET, and PVC.